Texas Food Truck Law Leaves Dallas Officials Scrambling

Nomad

Well-known member
Aug 26, 2023
394
77
You might be surprised to know Texas has passed 774 new laws and these laws will come into effect this Friday. If you are into the food truck business, one of the laws that will come into effect might concern you. House Bill 2878 is about food truck regulation. Now the health inspection of food trucks will be under the jurisdiction of counties instead of cities. But here's the kicker: it only applies to certain counties, specifically Tarrant and Dallas counties. The law will be applicable to counties with a population of 2.1 million or more and in the counties where there's also an airport for commercial flights.

Looks like the new food truck permits law in Dallas County will be almost identical to what's already in place in the city of Dallas. Therefore, the food truck operators shouldn't be too much worried.

You can read the details of the bill here
 
Location
Dallas, Texas, United States
It's great to see simple, common sense permitting reforms like this get implemented. Obviously, if you're a food truck operator doing business in more than one city - as I'm sure most do - it's got to be incredibly inconvenient and needlessly redundant to have separate health inspections and permitting requirements for each different jurisdiction. One of the state reps mentioned they're already expecting the law will be expanded to more counties in the next legislative session, which gives some sense of how well the change is already being received.
 
It's a very good thing to see the Texas take this path with their permitting process with respect to those in the food truck business. Even though the health inspection of food trucks is still going to start out only under counties, it's still a good progress. At least, there's a good thing to take from the whole process since the new law in Dallas County is exactly the same thing in the city of Dallas.
 
It's interesting to see how Texas is constantly evolving its laws, and these updates can indeed have an impact on various businesses. Regarding House Bill 2878, it seems like a sensible move to streamline food truck regulations, especially when it mirrors what's already in place in the city of Dallas. This should provide some reassurance to food truck operators in Dallas County, as it suggests a level of continuity and familiarity in the permitting process. It's essential for businesses to stay informed about these changes, but it's good to know that in this case, it may not be as disruptive as it initially sounds.
 
Back
Top