Attempts to regulate street vending in Orange County

Jake

Well-known member
Oct 30, 2023
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Found an article from NBC Los Angeles here, that is about new regulations on street vending in Orange County California. It seems as if there are a lot of illegal street venders across the county and nearby. Officials in the county are addressing this issue by enforcing permit requirements going forward in an act to regulate street vending in the area. They also plan to educate vendors on how to obtain such permits.

Some venders are concerned about the permit requirements, like Pablo Garcia for example, who's been an unpermitted street vendor for three years. He and others believe the process for obtaining a permit is problematic, and aren't sure of their chances for approval.

But there is some good news in regards to this. It sounds like the county is in contact with venders about the permit application process. And are willing to help them through it if needed. As well, there are resources available in multiple languages from The Orange County Health Agency's website. There you can find the requirements and the steps outlined on how to apply for a permit.

It sounds like they want to make sure everything is done by the rules and everyone is safe. It should be a way to benefit both the vendors and the community as a whole.
 
Location
Orange County, California, United States
I didn't know it was that bad, but I can see those street vendors without permits being a problem. And then you got the vendors who are legally permitted, and they went through the process. Don't know why some can't go through the process. My guess is maybe they aren't up to code or some other issues stopping them from getting a permit. It sounds like this Pablo guy might have some issues if he can't get a permit. Maybe the business is not to code or there are other factors blocking him from a permit or something.
 
Aren't most Orange County residents pretty wealthy? At least that's the stereotype that I've run across. So, I'm surprised that illegal street vendors would stand a chance of making a profit there. Yet, the article claims that nearly all street vendors are operating illegally. How strange. Well, if the county is looking for solutions, one major problem that I noticed is their permitting fees. Not many people can afford them, especially when they're first starting out. Plus, it's not like these folks are making much anyway.
 
I'm baffled at how little some of them make. It sounds like a tough job, to get out there in all sorts of weather and hawk your food. They're clearly hard workers with an entrepreneurial spirit. You'd think the county would bend over backwards to help them obtain the proper permits.
 
I didn't know it was that bad, but I can see those street vendors without permits being a problem. And then you got the vendors who are legally permitted, and they went through the process. Don't know why some can't go through the process. My guess is maybe they aren't up to code or some other issues stopping them from getting a permit. It sounds like this Pablo guy might have some issues if he can't get a permit. Maybe the business is not to code or there are other factors blocking him from a permit or something.
I would imagine in most major cities they may be dealing with a lot of these street vendors. It's become a massively popular thing to do these days, especially if you can land yourself a food truck you can pull around the city almost anywhere you want. I think there's going to be a lot more of these illegal street vendors pop up. I think rules like this can help, but we'd need it to happen in any major city with a lot of illegal street vending.
Aren't most Orange County residents pretty wealthy? At least that's the stereotype that I've run across. So, I'm surprised that illegal street vendors would stand a chance of making a profit there. Yet, the article claims that nearly all street vendors are operating illegally. How strange. Well, if the county is looking for solutions, one major problem that I noticed is their permitting fees. Not many people can afford them, especially when they're first starting out. Plus, it's not like these folks are making much anyway.
I can see that being true. California in general is an expensive place to live. I can see street vendors finding an easy home in these areas, because of the amount of wealthy people in the area. But the city is coming after those people who aren't permitted. Lowering the fees to obtain a permit could help.
I'm baffled at how little some of them make. It sounds like a tough job, to get out there in all sorts of weather and hawk your food. They're clearly hard workers with an entrepreneurial spirit. You'd think the county would bend over backwards to help them obtain the proper permits.
Especially living in California, you need to make really good money in order to continually live in the area. I can see some street vendors making good money, but not to the point they are able to live comfortably.
 
When you are selling, you make money. As long as you are making money, you should not have any problems in following law and order. Well, I do believe that getting permits can sometimes be very problematic but this does not mean people operating businesses form the street should avoid it. Permits should be mandatory but it should also be something that majority of people agree with
 
One thing that requiring a permit for general vending is that it would ensure health and safety standards as met because verification would be carried out before permits are issued out. And taxes would also be generated for the city through this move.
 
Regulating street vending involves balancing economic opportunities for the vendors and there must also be consideration of public health and safety because implementing regulations can help to address issues that is pertaining to sanitization and traffic congestion.
 
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