Scaffolding Right of Way Permits

chasnr

Member
Oct 31, 2023
8
8
I am a permit expediter that mainly pulls building permits for all types of scopes of work. Periodically, I have pulled Right of Way permits for Side Walk Cuts and Closures. I've recently been approached for a scaffolding permit in Baltimore City. I know this falls under the Right of Way Permit designation. While I pride myself in figuring out any type of permit processing, I figured I would post something here for any input/advice. I believe the contractor mentioned that there would not need to be any pedestrian traffic plans. Thank you in advance for your assistance.
 
Location
Baltimore, Maryland, United States
I am not an expert in this matter but based on my understanding you can do some of these things:
  1. Check if pedestrian traffic plans are actually needed.
  2. When you apply for permits, include site plans showing scaffolding placement, safety measures, and duration.
  3. Check compliance with local safety and obstruction regulations.
Checking with the Baltimore DOT for specific requirements and guidance is the best solution if you are not sure.
 
It sounds like you're well-versed in the permitting process for a variety of construction activities. I don't have a background with this, however I can tell you this much; with your background, you should be able to navigate the process effectively. Here are some steps and tips to help you with the scaffolding permit:
  1. Confirm Right of Way Permit Requirements: As you mentioned, scaffolding permits typically fall under the Right of Way Permit category. Double-check the specific requirements for Baltimore City to ensure you have all necessary documentation.
  2. Check for Specific Scaffolding Guidelines: Different cities have unique regulations regarding scaffolding. Look into Baltimore City's guidelines for scaffolding to ensure compliance with height restrictions, safety measures, and duration of the permit.
  3. Gather Required Documentation: Typical documentation includes the permit application, proof of insurance, detailed plans of the scaffolding setup, and any relevant contractor licenses. Even if pedestrian traffic plans are not required, having a basic outline of how the scaffolding will impact the area could be beneficial.
  4. Coordinate with the Contractor: Make sure to have a clear understanding from the contractor about the scope of work, timeline, and any specific needs or concerns they have. This will help you anticipate any additional requirements or questions from the permitting office.
  5. Contact the Baltimore City Permit Office: It's always a good idea to reach out directly to the Baltimore City permit office. They can provide the most up-to-date information and clarify any doubts you might have. Sometimes, cities have unique forms or additional steps that are not immediately obvious.
  6. Prepare for Inspections: Scaffolding often requires inspections to ensure safety standards are met. Be ready to coordinate these inspections and have the contractor address any issues promptly.
  7. Follow Up: Once the permit is submitted, follow up regularly with the permit office to ensure there are no delays. Keeping a close track of the permit status can help address any issues quickly and avoid delays.
By following these steps, you should be well-prepared to handle the scaffolding permit process in Baltimore City. Your experience with other types of Right of Way permits will certainly be advantageous in navigating any complexities that arise. Good luck!
 
Your job sounds interesting, chasnr. It's nice to have an expert join us.

Wouldn't your scaffolding fall under a temporary use permit? I don't believe that scaffolding is meant to stay up, so I think it qualifies. You can find the Temporary Use of Right of Way Permit Application right here.
 
It sounds like you're well-versed in the permitting process for a variety of construction activities. I don't have a background with this, however I can tell you this much; with your background, you should be able to navigate the process effectively. Here are some steps and tips to help you with the scaffolding permit:

@Oberon-Vortigern, are you doling out advice with the assistance of ChatGPT? This is totally a no judgement zone and I really just appreciate your participation here, but the detailed list you provided sounds a lot like the type of response ChatGPT might spit out when given a question like this. If you did use ChatGPT, maybe you could share which model and prompt you used? :)
 
Your job sounds interesting, chasnr. It's nice to have an expert join us.

Wouldn't your scaffolding fall under a temporary use permit? I don't believe that scaffolding is meant to stay up, so I think it qualifies. You can find the Temporary Use of Right of Way Permit Application right here.

Thanks @Saxton, it was great of you taking the time to try answering @chasnr's question. I would agree, that does appear to be the Baltimore City application form he would need to use.

@chasnr, hopefully this thread has been a least a little helpful. Would you mind updating us when you get your scaffolding permit application fully sorted out? I like to try to make these threads as informative as possible for other people who might stumble upon them in the future.

If you're still seeking input, someone else you might try is @Jeffrey Calderon. He interacted a bit on the forum a little while back but I haven't seen him around lately. He handles this type of permitting in New York City (his company: www.permitsinnotime.com).
 
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