Questions about who controls Indiana's water due to proposed pipeline.

Shortie

Well-known member
Jul 9, 2023
100
26
A proposed pipeline project in Indiana that is being discussed in an article from the Indianapolis Business Journal, aims to pump a large amount of water from Lafayette to the Research District in Lebanon and the LEAP Innovation. Significant gaps have been highlighted in Indiana's water-rights laws in this project, including ones, particularly concerning the lack of a review process or pre-approval for large water withdrawals by state regulatory agencies.

At this current time, only post-withdrawal issues can be addressed, this has raised concerns among Lafayette-area residents who are relying on the Wobash River aquifers. The state's efforts to balance local water supply concerns with the economic development goals of the LEAP district have also been mentioned in the article.

Steps have been taken to address these concerns by Governor Eric Holcomb, this includes initiating a comprehensive regional water study and transferring the water impact study's responsibilities.

The article however notes that residents have already experienced issues such as reduced water pressure and foul smells which is now raising concerns about the impact of the project.

Broader discussions are expected in the Indiana Legislature about the state's overall water needs and the need for a more comprehensive water plan influenced by this debate over this pipeline.

You can read more regarding this here
 
Location
Indianapolis, Indiana, United States
A proposed pipeline project in Indiana that is being discussed in an article from the Indianapolis Business Journal, aims to pump a large amount of water from Lafayette to the Research District in Lebanon and the LEAP Innovation. Significant gaps have been highlighted in Indiana's water-rights laws in this project, including ones, particularly concerning the lack of a review process or pre-approval for large water withdrawals by state regulatory agencies.

At this current time, only post-withdrawal issues can be addressed, this has raised concerns among Lafayette-area residents who are relying on the Wobash River aquifers. The state's efforts to balance local water supply concerns with the economic development goals of the LEAP district have also been mentioned in the article.

Steps have been taken to address these concerns by Governor Eric Holcomb, this includes initiating a comprehensive regional water study and transferring the water impact study's responsibilities.

The article however notes that residents have already experienced issues such as reduced water pressure and foul smells which is now raising concerns about the impact of the project.

Broader discussions are expected in the Indiana Legislature about the state's overall water needs and the need for a more comprehensive water plan influenced by this debate over this pipeline.

You can read more regarding this here

I think that the reduced water pressure and foul smells are from a couple of contributing factors. One would be the antiquated systems that Indiana has in place that need updating. For the foul smells, it could be the water source and in certain times of year there is an "algae bloom" that really makes the smell bad...but can't be masked with the high amounts of chlorine they add to the water to purify it. I used to live in Indiana and that was something we would experience.
 
Back
Top