Most unexpected?

Overtime

Member
Feb 20, 2024
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If you've ever thrown a public event, you might've been surprised at how many permits you needed to obtain. Whether you hosted a fundraiser for a non-profit, a commencement ceremony for graduates, a political gathering, or some other activity, which permit requirement did you not expect? What caught me off guard was a plastic fence. You know the type? They're usually bright orange, highly portable, and disposable. They're common around construction sites, but I decided to use them at the park to section off different games. I didn't expect to need a permit for that, since it's not a permanent fixture, but I was wrong.
 
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I guess I've been fortunate, because I haven't dealt with anything unusual. I've had good experiences at parks. Permits for waste, such as portable toilets and garbage, are all maintained by the city. Using an established area that's already set up for events, tends to make things easier.
 
If you've ever thrown a public event, you might've been surprised at how many permits you needed to obtain. Whether you hosted a fundraiser for a non-profit, a commencement ceremony for graduates, a political gathering, or some other activity, which permit requirement did you not expect? What caught me off guard was a plastic fence. You know the type? They're usually bright orange, highly portable, and disposable. They're common around construction sites, but I decided to use them at the park to section off different games. I didn't expect to need a permit for that, since it's not a permanent fixture, but I was wrong.
Yeah depending on your area, hosting a public event can require you to go through a few hoops and hurdles, and you may also have to pay some fees to get fully permitted. Now, it depends on the area, but there are rules we all need to follow. I would suggest speaking with your local permitting office to see what the rules and regulations are in your area for hosting an event like this.
I guess I've been fortunate, because I haven't dealt with anything unusual. I've had good experiences at parks. Permits for waste, such as portable toilets and garbage, are all maintained by the city. Using an established area that's already set up for events, tends to make things easier.
Oftentimes a park will have those already set up for use, but landing the park may in turn require a permit of its own.
 
I was surprised to learn that I'd need a special park permit if the crowd grew to a certain number. Luckily, the department worked with me to get my application through the process as quickly as possible.
 
If you've ever thrown a public event, you might've been surprised at how many permits you needed to obtain. Whether you hosted a fundraiser for a non-profit, a commencement ceremony for graduates, a political gathering, or some other activity, which permit requirement did you not expect? What caught me off guard was a plastic fence. You know the type? They're usually bright orange, highly portable, and disposable. They're common around construction sites, but I decided to use them at the park to section off different games. I didn't expect to need a permit for that, since it's not a permanent fixture, but I was wrong.
I would have never guessed being required to obtain a permit to use temporary fencing. I suppose it makes sense, but with it being temporary I see no issues, especially if you fully remove it after use. But I suppose it's a requirement because people probably often leave those fences behind for the city to clean up.

But yeah, there's got to be a ton of different types of permits you need in order to do a lot of these activities.
 
I was also unaware that you need permits even to have temporary structures such as plastic fence when you are organizing public events.The most unusual kind of permits I have heard of is related to scattering ashes of your loved ones. It is understandable that the have rules to follow but what surprised me was you need permit to do that.
 
Thanks for the question, @Overtime. I'm actually not surprised you needed a permit to fence off sections of a public park, even if the fencing you used was relatively unimposing. Even orange safety fencing can cause access through an area to be restricted (that's the point of it after all), so I can understand park authorities wanting to review/permit that. I've known people what have held small events at parks (e.g., small birthday parties for little kids) who didn't bother with permits. Intuitively, I'd say that if your event is going to even slightly impose on other park visitors, or otherwise affect the ability of others to use the park, then you should probably just inquire about permitting to be on the safe side. If the event I was holding was going to be fairly conspicuous (e.g., decent-sized crowd or footprint), I wouldn't want to risk drawing the attention of authorities and potentially disrupting the festivities I had planned.
 
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