Dallas Development Services switching to paperless permitting

Jake

Well-known member
Oct 30, 2023
203
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If you plan to file a commercial permit in Dallas Texas, you may no longer need to fill out a paper permit anymore, as the Dallas Development Services have decided to go paperless and start a digital process for permitting going forward. The change will go into affect May 1st, 2024, and you can file permits through the online portal through ProjectDox going forward. As an added bonus, you will also be able to follow updates on the permit through the same site.

For those new to using the internet or filing online, can take a free seminar on how to use the new system. You can find more details on this and more by following the full story here - WFAA and here - Hoodline
 
Location
Dallas, Texas, United States
I think we're going to see this happen everywhere sooner than later. I'm surprised more locations haven't fully moved their permitting process to a website or online portal. We're at a point where it'll make it so much easier to just make it all automated and online. And it sounds like they are implementing systems to better track your permits as well. I'm all for that. A move into the right direction.
 
It always surprises me to see our authorities using the age-old system for permitting. Therefore, whenever I hear about the changes going just like in Dallas, I feel very good. The shift towards a digital permitting process is in line with the new demands in the age of technology. When the permitting process is paperless there will be a lot of positive changes like increased efficiency for service providers and easier accessibility for service seekers, as well as reduced environmental impact.
 
It's clear that permitting offices have been making a big push toward electronic permitting systems, and this is just one example. I know we've chatted about several of these systems on the forum in recent months, but Dallas is probably one of the more major metros I've seen undertake the transition. What's interesting is seeing all these individual jurisdictions working with different companies to develop their own unique systems. For example, Dallas' ProjectDox system was developed by Avolve Software. I also recall our discussion of Nanaimo, British Columbia adopting Clariti permitting software, among other examples (e.g., for Frankfurt, IN and Santee, CA).

The variety of building/construction permitting platforms being adopted by local governments contrasts with California's requirement, under California Senate Bill 379, that all large cities and counties in the state to adopt a single specific platform for solar permitting: SolarAPP+. With so many different offerings being marketed by permitting software companies right now, I think it makes a lot of sense that states like California would want to reduce clutter and improve regulatory predictability by requiring adoption of one system across all jurisdictions.
 
It's clear that permitting offices have been making a big push toward electronic permitting systems, and this is just one example. I know we've chatted about several of these systems on the forum in recent months, but Dallas is probably one of the more major metros I've seen undertake the transition. What's interesting is seeing all these individual jurisdictions working with different companies to develop their own unique systems. For example, Dallas' ProjectDox system was developed by Avolve Software. I also recall our discussion of Nanaimo, British Columbia adopting Clariti permitting software, among other examples (e.g., for Frankfurt, IN and Santee, CA).

The variety of building/construction permitting platforms being adopted by local governments contrasts with California's requirement, under California Senate Bill 379, that all large cities and counties in the state to adopt a single specific platform for solar permitting: SolarAPP+. With so many different offerings being marketed by permitting software companies right now, I think it makes a lot of sense that states like California would want to reduce clutter and improve regulatory predictability by requiring adoption of one system across all jurisdictions.
I'm still surprised that we're still working on paper permits in many areas yet. I thought maybe 10 years ago we would have already digitized the process by now. But it just shows a lot of locations are taking far too long to adopt electronic permitting systems. This is at least a step into the right direction, I just hope it results in more offices moving paperless.
 
It's great to see Dallas Development Services embracing technology and going paperless for permitting. This move not only promotes efficiency but also contributes to environmental sustainability. The online portal through ProjectDox will make it easier for businesses to file permits and stay updated on their progress. The availability of free seminars for those unfamiliar with online filing shows a commitment to helping everyone adapt to the new system. Overall, this shift towards digital processes is a positive step forward for Dallas.
 
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