The Shocking Truth Behind Portsmouth Restaurants' Struggle with Outdoor Seating!

Debashis

Well-known member
Sep 5, 2023
222
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Ladies and gentlemen, it has come to my attention that Clipper Tavern in Portsmouth is facing a significant challenge. Despite their longstanding tradition of outdoor seating, they have been denied a permit for the fourth consecutive year. Importantly, Jeff, the proprietor, played a key role in the committee that initially allowed outdoor seating in the city. The consequences of this decision are substantial, as the outdoor space contributes a remarkable $300,000 to their summer revenue. Additionally, they usually employ seven extra staff members during the season, but now they will have to look for alternative employment. The city's decision is seemingly based on concerns about traffic inconvenience caused by the closure of a lane on Pleasant Street. However, one must consider whether supporting a locally-owned establishment is more important than temporary inconveniences. Regarding the process, establishments that have received approval can begin their outdoor seating operations on May 1, with the program running until October 10. It is certainly a challenging situation for Clipper Tavern. Learn more on the topic by clicking here
 
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For the City to deny Clipper Tavern permit for the fourth consecutive year is definitely something to be worried about. As it stands, they have been losing $300,000 each year for four years. This is absolute madness. So, for the closure of a lane on Pleasant Street, they City have decided to screw a business. What's stopping them from fixing whatever that led to closing a lane in Pleasant Street for 4 years?
 
Portsmouth isn't to far to where I am living, which is Dorset. Probably about a 2 hour drive. Quite mad that they've lost a lot of business over the years! Hopefully it picks up again in the future.
 
For the City to deny Clipper Tavern permit for the fourth consecutive year is definitely something to be worried about. As it stands, they have been losing $300,000 each year for four years. This is absolute madness. So, for the closure of a lane on Pleasant Street, they City have decided to screw a business. What's stopping them from fixing whatever that led to closing a lane in Pleasant Street for 4 years?

Something might be behind the decision not to grant Clipper Tavern a permit for outdoor seating. This is what we are yet to know, but whatever that it is, I don't think that it is right. There is need to sort it out to avoid some of the staff at the firm becoming unemployed too.
 
Something might be behind the decision not to grant Clipper Tavern a permit for outdoor seating. This is what we are yet to know, but whatever that it is, I don't think that it is right. There is need to sort it out to avoid some of the staff at the firm becoming unemployed too.

Seriously, I can't really pin my wits about it because there's no justification that's going to make any body stop another man's business for 4 years because they closed a road or a street. What in the world are they constructing for 4 years that's not getting completed?
 
Seriously, I can't really pin my wits about it because there's no justification that's going to make any body stop another man's business for 4 years because they closed a road or a street. What in the world are they constructing for 4 years that's not getting completed?

We can't say for sure what the problem is. It could be political or has something to do with trying to avert crime in Portsmouth. Not everything that has to do with permits are made public especially when there is a lot of delicate information that is attached to a decision that is being taken.
 
We can't say for sure what the problem is. It could be political or has something to do with trying to avert crime in Portsmouth. Not everything that has to do with permits are made public especially when there is a lot of delicate information that is attached to a decision that is being taken.

Can't the permitting department be sued? I believe that there's a way to sue a City for negligence and if I happen to be the one in the situation of being stopped from doing business for 4 years as my permit keeps being rejected because of their silly reason, there's no way I wouldn't sue them.
 
The situation at Clipper Tavern in Portsmouth raises an important question. Should authorities make laws that only benefit a certain segment of society, or certain businesses/companies? Or should the lay be comprehensive? The denial of outdoor sitting surely affects the business but we also need to see that this denial of outdoor sitting will create convenience for people and vehicles.
 
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