Do residential wastewater treatment permits usually expire?

Nomad

Well-known member
Aug 26, 2023
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Recently, I came across a post on Reddit from someone in Vermont who is dealing with an old wastewater permit from 2005. The poster says he is unsure if he should use the existing permit for an Advantex Treatment System or create a new septic design. The poster is also looking for advice on the lifespan and maintenance of the Advantex system compared to a conventional mound system.

What I was surprised to learn is that wastewater system permits, like this guy's Advantex permit from 2005, can have no expiration date. Is this normal for wastewater treatment systems? I'd think that local jurisdictions would want to reevaluate the systems they authorize over time as requirements and environmental considerations change.
 
Location
Vermont, United States
The good thing is that wastewater permits, like the one mentioned, usually don't expire. If the old permit is still valid towards the work you want to do along with it covering the necessary system, you should be able to proceed with said permit. This will also save you some money and time. It would also help you avoid more expenses and delays associated with the re-engineering.

I know The Advantex Treatment System is known for being quite reliable, with a low failure rate. As long as it's well maintained, and you're replacing the filter every 20 or so years, you should be good. I still suggest having annual inspections done, as a way to ensure the system is operating as intended.

There is a concern with cost, especially with an Advantex system, as it usually is higher priced in regards to installation and maintenance. Especially compared to the costs of installing conventional systems. And on top of it all, the cost of starting over and obtaining a new permit is not usually ideal.

Using an existing permit could help with speeding up the process, and also who's to say obtaining a new permit will be easy with the way the permitting systems are these days.
 
The good thing is that wastewater permits, like the one mentioned, usually don't expire. If the old permit is still valid towards the work you want to do along with it covering the necessary system, you should be able to proceed with said permit. This will also save you some money and time. It would also help you avoid more expenses and delays associated with the re-engineering.

I know The Advantex Treatment System is known for being quite reliable, with a low failure rate. As long as it's well maintained, and you're replacing the filter every 20 or so years, you should be good. I still suggest having annual inspections done, as a way to ensure the system is operating as intended.

There is a concern with cost, especially with an Advantex system, as it usually is higher priced in regards to installation and maintenance. Especially compared to the costs of installing conventional systems. And on top of it all, the cost of starting over and obtaining a new permit is not usually ideal.

Using an existing permit could help with speeding up the process, and also who's to say obtaining a new permit will be easy with the way the permitting systems are these days.
Huh, I didn't know that. I always assumed that permits do eventually expire, maybe not fast, but in a few years. It sounds like as long as you take care to replace the filter, a permit won't be needed for, well, forever, right?
 
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